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Chicago style guide: Image/chart

Chicago Style Guide

Citing images: photos, cartoons, graphys, charts, etc.

General guidelines for citing an image:

  • Images are generally cited in notes, not bibliographies.
  • If the image has no title, provide a brief description as a title.
  • Provide as much information as possible to direct your reader to the image you are citing. When citing a page in a print document, the illustration number (if available) follows the page number. Use the words table, graph, figure (abbreviated as fig.) when it is used in the source text.
  • For an image used in a PowerPoint presentation, put the image url or a brief citation in a small font directly under the image. Do not make a list of image citations at the end of your presentation.

Important! If you have an image that you found using Google images, do not cite Google images as the source. Click on "view this image in its original context" and cite the web page where the image is published. The image url should never end in ".jpg".

A photograph in a book, with a known author or news agency

Note

1. New China News Agency, Japanese tanks, in The Rape of Nanking, by Iris Chang (New York: Basic Books, 1997), 146.

Bibliography

New China News Agency. Japanese tanks. In The Rape of Nanking, by Iris Chang. New York: Basic Books, 1997.

  In the Notes example, 146 is the page number where the photograph is found.
 
A photograph in a book, with an unknown author
Note

2. "Angiogram of the Head," in Encyclopedia of the Human Body (New York: DK Publishing, 2002).

Bibliography

"Angiogram of the Head." In Encyclopedia of the Human Body. New York: DK Publishing,2002.

 
A photograph with an author, found on a website
Note

3. Dorothea Lange, "Destitute Pea Pickers in California. Mother of Seven Children. Age Thirty-two. Nipomo, California," Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Online Catalog,  http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/catalog.html.

Bibliography

Lange, Dorothea. "Destitute Pea Pickers in California. Mother of Seven Children. Age Thirty-two. Nipomo, California." Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Online Catalog. http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/catalog.html.

 
A political cartoon without a title, found in a book
Note

4. Charles Saxon, "The Question is...", in The New Yorker Book of Political Cartoons (Princeton, N.J.: Bloomberg Press, 2000), 42.

Bibliography

Saxon, Charles. "The Question is..." In The New Yorker Book of Political Cartoons. Princeton, N.J.: Bloomberg Press, 2000, 42.

  For an untitled political cartoon that includes text, use the first few words of the text followed by an ellipsis (three dots) as the title. If the cartoon has no author and no text, describe it in two or three words and use that description as the title, skipping the author information.
 
A political cartoon found on a website
Note

5. David Fitzsimmons, "Free Speech," cartoon, Arizona Star, March 8, 2011, http://www.politicalcartoons.com.

Bibliography

Fitzsimmons, David. "Free Speech." Cartoon, Arizona Star, March 8, 2011. http://www.politicalcartoons.com.

  If you found your cartoon on a cartoonists' index such as Daryl Cagle, include the newspaper publication information but provide the url of the cartoon index, not the newspaper.
 
A graph printed in a newspaper, found in a subscription database
Note

6. "Down 777.68 Points," graph, WSJ Market Data Group, Wall Street Journal, September 30, 2001, A1, Newsbank.

Bibliography

"Down 777.68 Points." Graph, WSJ Market Data Group, Wall Street Journal, September 30, 2001, A1. Newsbank.

 
A chart from a scholarly journal, found in a subscription database
Note

7. "Where Do You Stand," chart, Science 280, no. 5368 (May 29, 1998): 1366,JSTOR.

Bibliography

"Where Do You Stand." Chart, Science 280, no. 5368 (May 29, 1998): 1366. JSTOR.

  In the above example, the chart is in volume 280, number 5368. Do not use the abbreviation "vol."
 

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