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Chicago style guide: Book

Chicago Style Guide

Citing a book

Basic model for citing a book
Note

1. Author Firstname Lastname, Book Title (Publication City: Publisher, Publication date), page(s) used.

Bibliography

Author Lastname, Firstname. Book Title. Publication City: Publisher, Publication date.

  If no author is indicated, skip that part of the citation and begin with the book title. For publication city, don't indicate the state for easily-recognized cities such as New York, Chicago, San Francisco etc.
 
A book with one author
Note

1. Doug Fine, Farewell My Subaru: an Epic Adventure in Local Living (New York: Villard, 2008), 45.

Bibliography

Fine, Doug. Farewell My Subaru: an Epic Adventure in Local Living. New York: Villard, 2008.

 
A book with two or three authors
Note

2. James Bradley, Ron Powers and Susan Spark, Flags of our Fathers (New York: Bantam, 2002), 64.

Bibliography Bradley, James, Ron Powers and Susan Spark. Flags of our Fathers. New York: Bantam, 2002.
 
A book with more than three authors
Note

3. Sara Borden et al., Middle School: How to Deal (San Francisco: Chronicle Books, 2005), 25.

Bibliography

Borden, Sara, et al. Middle School: How to Deal. San Francisco: Chronicle Books, 2005.

  State the first author in the list and follow with et al. (which means "and all the others"). Be careful with the punctuation - there is no period after et!
 
A book with an editor instead of an author
Note

4. Leonard S. Klein, ed., Latin American Literature in the 20th Century: a Guide, (New York: Ungar, 1986), 144.

Bibliography

Klein, Leonard S., ed. Latin American Literature in the 20th Century: a Guide. New York: Ungar, 1986.

 
A book with an editor and an author
Note

5. Rigoberta Menchu, Crossing Borders, ed. and trans. Ann Wright (New York: Verso, 1999), 44.

Bibliography

Menchu, Rigoberta. Crossing Borders. Edited and translated by Ann Wright. New York: Verso, 1999.

  Spell out translated, edited etc. in bibliographies; abbreviate in notes.
 
A chapter or special section of a book; a poem in an anthology
Note

6. Thomas H. Huxley, “The Darwinian Hypothesis,” in Galileo’s Commandment: Great Science Writing, ed. Edmund Blair Bolles (New York: W.H. Freeman, 1997), 257-266.

Bibliography

Huxley, Thomas. "The Darwinian Hypothesis." In Galileo’s Commandment: Great Science Writing, edited by Edmund Blair Bolles, 257-266. New York: W.H. Freeman, 1997.

 
A book read on a website
Note

7. Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, (2011), 108,  Gutenberg Project.

Bibliography

Austen, Jane. Pride and Prejudice. 2011. Gutenberg Project.

  Provide either the url or the name of the website where you found the book. If publication information is available, include it following the examples above.
 
A book read in a subscription database
Note

7. Matthew J. Flynn and Washington and Stephen E. Griffin, Washington and Napoleon: Leadership in the Age of Revolution (Washington DC: Potomac, 2011), 47, eBook Collection (EBSCOHost).

Bibliography

Flynn, Matthew J. and Stephen E. Griffin. Washington and Napoleon: Leadership in the Age of Revolution. Washington DC: Potomac, 2011.

 
A book read on a digital device
Note

7. Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid's Tale (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 1986), loc. 124 of 5000, Kindle.

Bibliography

Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 1986. Kindle.

  State the name of the app or device. If possible, include the location number and the total number of locations in place of a page number.
 

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